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Tea Or Coffee: Which one is better?

Tea Or Coffee: Which one is better? This is a very black and white question. However, it is a great one.

First of all, we have to find out which one is more popular around the world!

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These stats are from 2016. Very Interesting! So now that we can see who prefer coffee and who prefer tea. It’s time to look at the numbers.

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We can see from this that Uzbekistan and Kenya are the biggest tea drinkers.

But the real question is which is better. The problem however is that the answer will vary from person to person. Personally I consume around 3-4 cups of coffee a day. Then after 6, if I consume any more coffee, I won’t be able to go sleep. So that is the time for a steaming cup of tea. A warm cup of tea also helps me to fall asleep.

According to www.health.com here are some Pro’s and Con’s of each.

Tea –

The pros: Tea boasts a long list of health benefits. The rich antioxidants in tea fight inflammation, and have been shown to help prevent blood vessels from hardening. Tea drinkers have a significantly lower risk of stroke and heart disease, and tea is known to boost brain health. One study, for example, found that compared with older adults who drank less than three cups a week, those who drank more than two cups of green tea a day had a significantly lower risk of age-related declines in memory. Regular tea drinkers also have higher bone density levels and slower rates of bone loss. Overall it’s associated with anti-aging: research shows that the cells of regular tea drinkers have a younger biological age than non-drinkers.

The cons: The first one is purely stained teeth. Another is the potential impact on your iron levels due to tanins, a type of antioxidant that interferes with the absorption of non-heme, or plant-based iron from foods like greens and beans. In one classic 1982 study drinking tea with a meal resulted in a 62% reduction in iron absorption compared to 35% for coffee. Finally, if you’re sensitive to it, the caffeine in tea may also be a con, although the levels are lower than coffee. One cup or eight ounces of black tea contains 14-70 mg of caffeine, and green tea 24-45 mg, compared to 95-200 mg in the same sized portion of coffee.

Coffee –

Pros: The good news about coffee just keeps on coming. A brand new Harvard study found that those who drink about three to five cups of coffee a day may be less likely to die prematurely from some diseases than those who drink less or no coffee. A rich source of antioxidants, regular coffee consumption has also been linked to protection against type 2 diabetes and certain cancers.

Cons: Natural substances in unfiltered coffee (meaning boiled or espresso) have been shown to raise cholesterol levels slightly. Also coffee is more acidic than tea, so if you have stomach or digestive issues you may tolerate tea better.

Coffee has long had a reputation for bone issues, but it remains unclear how significant the effects are. One study found that a high intake of coffee, four or more cups a day reduced bone density by 2-4%, but the effect didn’t translate to an increased risk of fracture. However, if you already have low bone density coffee consumption is something you should discuss with your physician.

The remaining cons of coffee are primarily tied to its caffeine content, which again is higher than in tea. Caffeine is a stimulant, so if you’re sensitive to it coffee may leave you feeling overly stimulated, jittery, and anxious. If you have high blood pressure, you should limit your caffeine intake because caffeine can cause a short, but dramatic spike in blood pressure. Finally, coffee is a known diuretic, meaning it flushes water from the body. Research shows that your body can adjust to a regular habit, but if you only have it once in a while, or you have more than usual, it could leave you dehydrated.

Soooo?

Stick with what you prefer, take the cons into account, and be sure you aren’t using the caffeine in either tea or coffee as a crutch, to mask fatigue from too little sleep. While you may get a benefit from using caffeine pre-exercise it’s best to cut off caffeine completely at least six hours before bed for optimal sleep.

Source: Health.com

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